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City of Winchester
Winchester Cathedral
Park in one of the city's fairly expensive (£5 all day) long stay car parks about 2/3 mile from the city centre. There is an entrance fee of  £5.00 - which is also the cost of an annual pass. There is no extra charge for photography. The staff are very friendly and welcoming.
Website
Lady Chapel  S.E. Chapel  N.E. Chapel  Retrochoir-Nave  Retrochoir-S.Aisle  Retrochoir-N.Aisle  Choir  N.Choir Aisle  S.Choir Aisle  N.Transept
S. Transept - Nave S. Transept - Chapels Nave South Aisle North Aisle

Some Notes on the Religious Foundations in Winchester
Around 648 Cynegils, King of Wessex, built a church in Winchester which came to be known as The Old Minster. The actual see was originally founded at Dorchester in Oxfordshire in 635 but was moved to Winchester in 679 when the church became a Cathedral Church. The Old Minster acted as a burial place for the Kings of Wessex and Bishops of Winchester. This church was enlarged by Bishop Athelwold, being rededicated in 980 and again in 993.
In 1079 Walkelin, the first Norman Bishop of Winchester, began a new church which was ready for worship in 1093. The Old Minster was abandoned and demolished, although the bones of the various kings and bishops were translated to this new church, which survives in part as the Winchester Cathedral of today. The Old Minster was situated north of the nave of the present church and was excavated  between 1961 and 1966 by the archaeologist Martin Biddle; these excavations are described in The Old Minster; Excavations near Winchester Cathedral 1961 by Martin Biddle (Winchester 1970). Today Winchester is a Cathedral of the New Foundation.
King Alfred and his Queen founded two monastic churches in Winchester. Alfred's foundation - The New Minster - was close to the Old Minster,  so close, in fact, that singing from the one church is said to have disturbed those in the other and, according to William of Malmesbury, effected a rivalry which led to 'frequent injuries on either side'! Alfred's Queen founded the Abbey of St Mary, usually known as The Nuns' Minster. These two churches were completed by Alfred's son, King Edward the Elder and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that the New Minster was consecrated in 903. William of Malmesbury writes that King Alfred was firstly buried in the Old Minster because the New Minster was not yet ready at the time of his death. When the New Minster was completed, Edward removed his father's body for  reburial in the new church. Alfred's Queen, although she died on the Nuns' Minster, of which she became abbess, was also buried there. Edward himself was also buried in the New Minster as was King Edwy at a later time.
And there they remained until William Giffard removed the New Minster to Hyde - a suburb of Winchester - in 1110 (time of Henry I). The bodies of Alfred, his Queen and Edward the Elder were translated to Hyde, being taken in procession by the monks to their new home - now know as Hyde Abbey. The New Minster itself was demolished. At Hyde Abbey they rested in peace in  until the Dissolution of the Monastries when the abbey fell into lay hands, the church was demolished and the graves lost. The possible sites of the graves were found in recent excavations but the contents and any monuments have been lost. Click here for a fairly light hearted investigation of the whole story

Lady Chapel South-East (Bishop Langdon's) Chapel

This is a modern stone to Bishop White (1560). A coffin was found in this position which was assumed to be his . He was headmaster of Winchester College, where he prepared a memorial brass in the chapel,  and later Bishop of Winchester under Mary I. He fell into disfavour under Elizabeth I and was deprived of his see in 1559, six months before his death

Bishop Langton (1500)
The Purbeck  Marble tomb chest fills the chapel. The lid has a brass indent. Arms carved on the chest. He was elected Archbishop of Canterbury but died of the plague a few days later.

North-East (Guardian's Angels') Chapel




Richard Weston, Lord Portland (1634)
A large monuments with a bronze effigy by Le Sueur. A minister of Charles I who eventually became Lord High Treasurer of England - among many other posts  - and a most unpopular man: The prime agent of iniquity as he was called in the House of Commons by John Eliot


Bishop Peter Mews (1706)
Fought at Naseby, where he was taken prisoner. After the Execution of Charles I, retired to Holland where he acted as Royalist agent. As a reward was awarded many ecclesiastical preferments. Fought at Sedgemore for James II where he was wounded and afterwards wore a black patch over his cheek to hide the scar. Buried in the Earl of Portland's vault. He is said to have neglected his diocese

Arnold de Gaveston (early 14th C)
This is the front only, showing shields with arms, of a Purbeck marble tomb chest. The corresponding effigy is in the retrochoir (qv)
Retro-Choir: Nave

Saint Swithun's 'Shrine' The acutal shrine was destroyed at the Dissolution. This structure, over a inscription on the floor, is by Brian Thomas & Wilfred Carpenter Turner 1962 

Bishop Waynflete (1486) Chantry Chapel & Effigy. The effigy was repainted in 1932. Arms but inscription lost. He was the first provost of Eton, founder of Magdelene College, Oxford and chanceller under Henry VI

Above: Bishop Charles Richard Sumner (1874) cenotaph by Henry Weekes 1876
Below Left: Prior William de Basyng (1295) The slab is carved with a foliated cross and a mitre: a mitred prior is unusual but the privilage was conferred by Pope Innocent IV in 1254. Inscription around three sides of the edge of the lid. See below.
Below Right: Bishop Godfrey de Lucy (1204) Plain Purbeck slab but with matrices of sockets to hold candles. Son of Richard,  Chief Justiciar of Henry II

Cardinal Beaufort (1477) Chantry Chapel and Effigy. Unlike Bp Waynflete's this chapel is open. The rather crude effigy is 17th century work, possibly being a copy of that destroyed in 1642 by William Waller's army when the cathedral was ransacked. Arms but brass inscription lost. Son of John of Gaunt, half-bother to Henry IV; weathy and more of a statesman and soldier than an ecclesiastic. Persecuted the Lollards and took part in the trial of Joan of Arc whose image now looks down on him!

Other Monuments in this Site
1. large slab with brass matrix of an ecclesiastic, on floor west of St Swithun's Shrine

Inscription on the William de Basyng Tomb:
HIC JACET WILLELMUS DE BASYNGE QVANDAM PRIOR ISTIVS ECCLESIE CVJVS ANIME PROPICIETVR DEVS: ET QVI ANIMA EJVS ORAVERIT III ANNOS C ET XLV DIES INDULGENCIÆ PERCIPIET
(Here lies William de Basinge, formerly Prior of this church, on whose soul may God have mercy: and whosoever shall pray for his soul shall obtain an indulgence of three years, one hundred and forty-five days)

Note
The Romanesque apse was demolished in the early 14th century and the present straight screen constucted, the entrance to the Holy Hole, under a platform behind the screen, forming a central and unusual feature. Along the front of the screen is cut an inscription:
The bodies of saints lie here buried in peace,
From whose merits many miracles shine forth
.
A row of canopied niches, which orginally contained statues removed at the Reformation,  can be seen in this screen. Below these niches are cut a series of names:
Kinegilsus Rex; Sanctus Birinus Episcopus; Kinewaldus Rex; Egbertus Rex, Adulphus Rex; Eluredus Rex, filius eius; Edwardus Rex Senior; Adthelstantus Rex, filius eius; Sancta Maria; Dominus Iesus; Edredus Rex;  Edgarus Rex; Emma Regina; Alwinus Episcopus; Ethelredus Rex; Sanctus Edwardus Rex, filius eius; Cnutus Rex; Hardecnutus Rex, filius eius.
It is said that these statuettes were probably intended to commemorate the kings and bishops whose bones originally lay in chests on the platform above but are now in the mortuary chests. However it includes some who were certainly not buried at Winchester and well as Jesus and the Virgin Mary. It thus may be intended as a display statues of preconquest kings and others not at all related to burials

Retrochoir - South Aisle


Plan of Floor Slabs in South Aisle of Retrochoir
(not to scale - west is at the top)
Those not shown are as follows:
14. badly defaced or removed stone; possibly Thomas Higgons
18. Henry Surtees Altham (1965) 'teacher, author, cricketer, soldier' & his wife Alison (1970)


17. Lady Elizabeth Shirley (1740)


16. Frances Cecil (née Brydges), Dowager Countess of Exeter (1663)

13. Elizabeth, Countess of Essex
(1656) She married 1. Robert Devereux , Earl of Essex, the Parliamentary commander in the first part of the Civil War and 2. Thomas Higgons

9. Prebendary Dr Baptista Levinz (1693
) very large ledger stone, now partly buried under radiator. He was bishop of the Isle of Man.
14. Henry, Lord Pawlett (1672)
10. his wife Francisca (1682)
11. & son Essex (1682)

12 Alexander Alchorne 1705

5. James Touchet, Baron Audley, 5th Earl of Castlehaven (1700)

1. William Fulham
(1699) infant son of Prependary Dr George  Fulham and Catherine, who had died in childbirth.


Sir John Clobery MP (1687)
Alabaster by Sir William Wilson. His stone is lost but those of his children remain and are listed in this section.

 

6. Frances (1683), 7. Elizabeth (1673) & 8. John Clobery (1670).Children of Sir John.


4.  William Holden Hutton (1930)


3. Stone with matrix of ecclesiastical brass


2. Elizabeth Briscoe (1680)


William Walker (1918)
The famous Diver of Winchester Cathedral. The bronze on the left has been in the Cathedral for about 25 years; that on the right was recently donated by a visitor as a more accurate portrait taken from his photographs.
Retro-Choir: North Aisle

Torso of bishop or prior 13th century

  

There are several ledger stones and flat stones in this part of the cathedral but many are worn or damaged to varying extents rendering them totally or partially illegible. The numbers refer to the floor plan which I will provide after my next visit to the cathedral.









1. Nic Alexander 1635 Flat stone
2. Rob Alexander 16__ Flat Stone
3. Susannah Taylor 1669 Age 4 Flat Stone
6. Illegible - 'Joannis'
9. Possibly Francis Alexander 1663
10. Illegible - 'Doro__Joynter--'
12. Illegible - 'Alexander'
13 Illegible
16. Illegible - '..age 16..'
A Obliterated
B Obliterated
19. Illegible - '1636'
21. Possibly Robert Mason
22. Possibly Catherine Mason
23. Illegible
24. Son of Henry Perin 1694/5
26. Elizabeth Kercher 1637 Wife of Canon Kercher
27. Illegible
28. Sara Tichborne 1616 Age 6 week Flat Stone

4. Dr Arthur Taylor 1647 Physician


5. Edward Dennis 1667


7.Susannah Coker 1714
wife of Dr Wm Coker


8.Dr William Coker 1704
Physician

 


11. Frances Preston 1689

 


Above: 14 Susannah (1689) & William (1686) Coker

Right: 15. Francis (1683) & Claus (1686) Coker
These four infants were the children of Dr Coker


17.  William Symonds 1606

Twice mayor of and benefactor to Winchester


18. Prebendary Christopher Perin (or Peryn) 1612

Note that the Latin inscription has been cut to read on the long axis of the stone


20.
Clearly the stone marks the burial of a child but only the initials 'IA' are inscribed


5. Henry Perin 1694

 

Choir
The Mortuary Chests
These chests are on the top of the choir screens, three to the north and three to the south. I have described them as a plan with east upwards.  I have dealt on this page with what can be seen; click here for further information about them. Below are photographs of the chests with an attempted transcription of the inscriptions and their translation. Notes the the letter N has been reversed on the eastern and central chests but not in the later western ones. Note also the various attempts to include all the inscriptions. I have used the spellings of the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Danish names as they appear in The Handbook of British Chronology

NORTH SIDE - EAST CHEST

Choir Side 
REX·KYNGILS·OBIIT ·A°· DM 641
 (King Cynegils died A.D. 641)
KYNGILSI IN CISTA HAC SIMVL
OSSA IACENT ET ADVLPHI IPSVS
FVNDATOR HIC BENEFACTOR ERAT

(The bones of Cynegils and Æthelwulf lie together in this chest - the former was the founder, the latter was the benefactor of this church.)

Aisle Side
ADVLPHVS·R OBIT A· DM 857
(King  Ethelwolf died A.D 857)
KYNGILSI IN CISTA HAC SIMOL
OSSO IACENT ET ADVLPHI IPSIVS
FVNDATOR HIC BENEFACTOR ERAT  

SOUTH SIDE - EAST CHEST

Choir Side 
EDMVDUS·REX·OBIIT·A°·DM
(King Edmund died AD ____ )
QVE·THECAHEC·RETINET·
EDMVDV·SVSC
IPE·CHRISTE·QVI·VIVENTE· PATRE
SCEPTRA·TVLIT·
(Him who this chest contains and who swayed the royal scepter while his father was yet living, do thou, O Christ, receive.)

Aisle Side  
EDMVDUS·REX·OBIIT·A°·DM 

QVE·THECA·HEC·RETINET·
EDMVNDV·SVSCIPE·CHRISTE·
QVI·VIVENTE·PATRE·REGIA·
SCEPTRA·TVLIT·

   

NORTH SIDE - CENTRAL CHEST

 Choir Side
EGBERTVS REX OBIT·AM. 837
(King Ecgberht died A.D 837)
HIC·REX·EGBERTVS·PAV
SAT·CV·REGE·KENVLPHO
NOBIS·EGREGIA·MVNERA·VIO·TVLIT ( Here King Ecgberht rests, together with King Cenwealh. Each of them bestowed great wealth upon us)

Aisle Side
KENVLPHVS·REX·OBIT·Aº·DM·714
(King Cynewulf died A D 714)
HIC·REX· EGBERTVS PAVSAT·CV·  REGE·KENVLPHO·NOBIS· EGRE
GIA·MVNERA·VIERO·TVLIT·

SOUTH SIDE -CENTRAL CHEST

 Choir Side
 EDREDVS·REX·OBIIT·A°·DM ·9·5·5·
(King Eadred died AD 955)
 HOC·PIVS IN·TVMVLO·REX·EDRED
REQVIESCIT·QVI·HAS·BRITON
VM ·TERRAS·REXERIT
·EGREGIE

(The pious King Edred rests in this tomb who admirablly governed this country of the Britons)

Aisle Side
EDREDVS·REX OBIIT·A°·DM·9·5·5·
(King Edred died AD 955)
 HOC·PIVS·IN·TVMVLO·REX

·EDRED REQVIESCIT·
QVI·HAS·BRITONVM
TERRAS·

REXERIT·EGREGIE

NORTH SIDE - WEST CHEST

Choir Side 
IN HAC ET ALTERA E REGIONE
CISTA RELIQVIÆ SVNT OSSIUM
CANVTI  ET RVFI REGV EMMÆ REGINÆ WINA ET ALWINI EPORVM

In this chest and in that opposite to it on the other side are the remains of Cnut and of Rufus, Kings, Emma, Queen; and of Wine and Ælfwine, Bishops. 

Aisle Side
HAC EN CISTA A·Dº1661 PROMIS
CVE RECONDITA SVNT OSSA PRIN CIPVM ET PRÆTATOVM SACRILE GA BARBARI DISPERS AºD 1642

In this chest A.D. 1661 were promiscuously laid together the bones of princes and prelates, which had been scattered about by sacriligious barbarism in the year 1642

SOUTH SIDE - WEST CHEST

Choir Side 
IN HAC ET ALTERA E REGIONE
CISTA RELIQVIÆ SVNT OSSIUM
CANVTI  ET RVFI REGV EMMÆ REGINÆ WINA ET ALWINI EPORVM

In this chest and in that opposite to it on the other side are the remains of Cnut and of Rufus, Kings, Emma, Queen; and of Wine and Ælfwine, Bishops. 

Aisle Side
HAC IN CISTA A·D 1661º
PROMISCVE RECONDITA SVNT OSSA PRINCIPVM ET PRÆTATO RVM SACRILE
GA BARBARI
DISPERSA AºD 1642
In this chest A.D. 1661 were promiscuously laid together the bones of princes and prelates, which had been scattered about by sacriligious barbarism in the year 1642

The 'King Edmund' Stone

The 'William Rufus' Tomb

Not in situ; this stone is now set in the stone seating below the screen on the south side of the choir. It is the approximate length of a grave slab. Click here for further information about this stone. The insciption can just be made out in the photograph:
HIC IACET EDMUNDUS REX EÞELREDI REGIS FILIUS
(Here lies King Edmund, son of King Ethelred)

 This well known tomb with the Purbeck marble lid is traditionally said to be that of King William ('Rufus') II, who was accidentally killed while hunting in the New Forest. He was buried under the tower which promptly collapsed: an act of divine wrath directed against the king, or at least the wrath of the monastic chroniclers! The tomb has been moved and opened on several occasions. There are varying accounts of its contents but it is now considered to be that of Bishop Henry de Blois

Bishop Fox Chantry Chapel

Bishop Gardener Chantry Chapel


Richard Fox ( 1528).  Secretary to Henry VII & Henry VIII. Founder of Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Builder of screen and choir aisles. Grave excavated in 1820 when his coffin containing inscription on vellum found. Corpse effigy.

Stephen Gardener (1555) Chancellor of Queen Mary I and known as the 'Hammer of the Heretics'. Note how his corpse effigy has suffered much damage compared with that of Bishop Fox.

Medieval Bishops

Bishop Courtenay (1492) He was originally buried in the North East Chapel but his lead coffin was removed and placed in the crypt when this chapel became the Weston burial place (time: Charles I). Moved to present position by Dean Kitchen when the tomb chest was constructed;  the lid with its matrix of a large cross is 15th century

Bishop John of Pontoise (1304) The tomb passes through the screen and appears in the aisle, where there is an inscription. (see below) The main part of the tomb chest is c 1525 but the lid and base are early 14th century.

Bishop Richard Toclyve (1189). This tomb chest is let into the choir screen and dates from about 1525. This inscription reads:
PRÆSULIS EGREGII PAUSANT RICARDI TOCLYVE CUI SUMMI GAUDIA SUNTO POLI
(Here rest the remains of good Bishop Toclyve; may he enjoy the bliss of heaven)

Modern Bishops and Deans

Bishop Lancelot Andrews (1555-1626)
Bishop 1618-1626
Buried in Southwark Cathedral.

Dean  Edward Gordon Selwyn DD.
He was Dean 1931-1958

 Dean William Richard Wood Stephens (1902)
He was Dean 1895-1902

Dean John Bramston (1889)

Two modern wall monuments

Two modern floor brasses at the head at foot of the 'Rufus Tomb'


Choir Aisle - North

Tombs in the Choir Screen
Reburials in the screen wall by Fox

Some Modern Wall Monuments


King Hardicanute (1042)

QVI IACET HIC
REGNI SCEPTRVM TVIIT
HARDICANVTVS
EMMÆ CNVTONIS
GNATVS & IPSE FVIT
OBIIT. A. D. J042

(He who lies here, by name Hardicanute, bore the sceptre of the kingdom, being the son of Emma and Canute. He died AD 1042

 


Bishop Bishop Audemar, Aymer or  Ethelmar de Valance (1260)
CORPUS ETHELMARI CVIVS COR NUNC TENET ISTVD SAXVM PARISIIS MORTE DATVR TVMVLO OBIIT A.D. J26J
(The body of Ethelmar, whose heart this stone now contains, died and was entombed in Paris. He died AD 1261)
This is presumably the original site of the heart burial recorded by Fox. The Bishop was highly unpopular and was lavished with preferements by Henry III. He election - at twenty-three-  to Winchester was forced on the monks by the King. He was eventually consecrated in 1260 - having been ordained priest the day before - but died soon afterwards. 

Top: Archdeacon Mathew Woodford MA (1807) & this sister Mary
Bottom: Sir William Wyndham Portal (1932)

Bishop John of Pontoise (1304)
DEFVNCTI CORPVS
TVMVLVS TENET ISTE
JOANNIS POINTES
WINTONIÆ PRÆSVLIS
EXIMII. OBIT 1304
(This tomb contains the body of John Pointes, an excellent bishop of Winchester, who died 1304)
This is the other side of the tomb - see above

Choir Aisle - South

Tombs in the Choir Screen
Reburials in the screen wall by Fox

Prince William, Son of William the Conqueror
He was accidentally killed while hunting in the New Forest. The original coffin with inscription can just be seen

Bishop Nicholas (1280)

 On the wall above:
INTVS EST CORPVS RICHARI WILLHELMI CONQVESTORIS FILII ET BEORNÆ DUC
(Within this wall is the body of Richard, son of William the Conqueror and Duke of Beornia.

 Inscribed on the coffin:
HIC JACET RICHARDUS WILLHELMI SENIORIS REGIS FILLI ET BEORN DUX 
(Here lies Richard, son of King William the Elder and Duke of Beornia)

INTVS EST COR NOCHOLAI OLIII WINTON EPISCOPI CVIVS CORPVS EST APUD WAVARLEI
(Within this wall is the heart of Nicholas, late Bishop of Winchester, whose body lies at Waverely)


Field Marshall Francis Lord Grenville (1959)


Bishop William Wickham (1595) He was buried in Southwark Cathedral.


Lord Leopold Arthur Louis Mountbatten (1922) & Prince Maurice Victor Donald of Battenberg (killed in action 1914)

Bishop Brownlow North (1820)
by Chantrey; the Latin inscription was written by Dean Rennell. He is buried with his wife in the nave.
The bishop was a Trollope like character: he owed his bishopric - from which he drew the vast revenues for over 40 years - to his half-brother, Lord North, the Prime Minister. For some years he resided in Italy with his fashionable wife.

Far Right Top: Captain William Joseph Wickham (killed in action Ypres 1914) & his brother Captain Cyril Henry Wickham (died of wounds 1915)
Far Right Bottom: Dr Huntingford 1906 Copper-gilt tablet by Kempe. He was headmaster of Eagle House School, Hammersmith and honorary canon of the cathedral.

North Transept

 Left: General Sir Redvers Buller VC (1908) Cenotaph with bronze effigy by Sir Bernard Mackennal 1910. See the Devon page for wall monuments in Exeter and Crediton and the General's grave in Crediton.
Above: Prebendary Frederick Iremonger (1820) Cenotaph by Chantrey. Inscription by Dean Rennell. Buried at Wherwell. Educationalist and man of compassion who died at 39.
Right Top:  Purbeck marble coffin lid with foliated cross said to be that of Prior Roger of Normandy (early 13th century)
Right Lower: Canon Bertram Kier Cunningham (1944) Wood by Alan Durst. Behind tablet to Mary Pescod (1732) (East Aisle)

There are other monuments in this transept but I did not have time to complete the survey and part of the transept was roped off for safety reasons. I will try to complete this area in the spring.

South Transept - Nave

Top: Colonel Guy Baring (killed in action, Somme 1916)
Bottom: Major General Sir John Campbell (killed in action, Sevastopol 1855)
and to the right:
Dean Garnier (1812) by Richard Cockle Lucas

Top: Bishop Samuel Wilberforce (1873) Monument designed by Sir G G Scott; sculpted by H H Armstead 1878. Son  of the anti-slavery campaigner . Known as 'Soapy Sam' and who, according to Disraeli, ...'is more odious...than Archbishop Laud.'  He died in a riding accident and was buried in Lavington church yard.
Bottom: Admiral Sir Issac Townsend (1731) One of the few naval monuments in the Cathedral

Top: Colonel Lacy W Yeo & Others (1854-5) All killed in action, died of wounds or disease in the Crimea Campaign.
Bottom: David Williams (1860) White marble showing Faith, Hope and Charity by W Theed. Headmaster and later warden of New College, Oxford where he was buried in the antechapel.

South Transept - Chapels

North Chapel South Chapel

Catherine Eyre (1732)

William Eyre (1764)
Serjeant-at-Law

Prebendary Dr Robert Eyre (1722)

Warden Dr John Nicholas (1712)
By William Woodman of London

Issac Walton (1683)
Fisherman and Author

Nave
Chantry Chapels

Bishop William of Eddington (1366) Alabaster effigy & chapel from nave and south transept. Purbeck marble tomb chest. Note the fylfot - or swastika - pattern and inscription on amice and maniple. Arms. His hands, now damaged, are  in benediction not in prayer. Chancellor under Edward III. He was elected Archbishop of Canterbury but declined and died shortly afterwards

Bishop William of Wykeham (1404) Effigy and tomb chest of alabaster. Chantrey chapel from nave.  Inscription of brass on the chamfer. Arms Restored 1894-97. Chancellor under Edward III. Opponent of John Wycliffe. He remodelled the nave transforming Walkelin's Norman nave to the Perpendicular style. Founder of Winchester College and New College Oxford.

Modern Bishops

Left: Bishop William Hoadley (1761) A controversial, able and sincere man; he appointed prebendaries who were likewise able not just those who were well connected. Called by his opponents 'the greatest dissenter that ever held preferement in the church' & 'a vile republican'.
Above: Bishop Harold Browne (1891) Cenotaph designed by Bodley & Garner, executed by Farmer & Brindley. Buried at Westland, near Southhampton

South Aisle

Captain Raymond Portal (1893) & Sir Gerald H Portal (1894)  Brother diplomats, who died young. By Walso Story

Sir George Provost (1816) Marble by Chantrey. In 1811 appointed Governor-General of Canada and C-in-C of British Provinces in N. America

Bishop Willis (1734) by Sir Henry Cheere (signed). He reclines on a stack of books: he was one of the founders of SPCK. Note he faces west: an error said to have preyed on the sculptor's mind

 Bishop Sir George Pretyman Tomline (1827) by R Westmacott Jnr. Friend and secretary of William Pitt, whose biography he wrote.

 Prependary Joseph Warton by Flaxman . Headmaster of Winchester College



Top: Thomas Woods Knollys, assumed Earl of Banbury (1792)
Lower: James Lampard (1859), Chapter Clerk. His nephew, the latter's son and then his son, who also became chapter clerks.

Prebendary Christopher Eyre MA(1743) Second Master, Winchester College. Cartouche fixed to the Wykeham Chantrey.

 

Top: Sir Roundell Palmer, 1st Earl of Selbourne (1895) He served two terms of Lord Chancellor (hence the wig) under Gladstone. Buried at Selbourne. By F W Pomeroy
Lower: Sir Henry Myers Elliot (1833) Indian Civil Service

 

Prebendary Dr William Harris STP (1700) Headmaster, Winchester College. Cartouche fixed to the Wykeham Chantrey.

Mr William John Wickham FRCS (1864) Surgeon at Hants County Hospital for 40 years. White marble by R C Lucas

Below the cartouche is this small marble stone marking his grave:
Hic Sepultus est Gulielmus Harris S.TP.



Above, far left: Top of illustration: John Pentone (1724) & Deborah (1744) Bottom of illustration: Lt William Carmichael Forrest (1881) & Selina. Killed by the explosion of his ship's magazine and its subsequent foundering; his body was recovered and buried at Sandy Point
Above second row: Top of illustration: John Dolbel Le Couteur (1925). Lower: Canon John Vaughan MA Canon of Wincheser 1909-22. He wrote the standard work: Winchester Cathedral: It's Monuments and Memorials (much consulted in preparing this page!) among others. Note the delightful plants and birds carved in low relief. 
Above fourth row: Top of illustration: Archdeacon Dr Thomas Balguy (1795) He declined the offer of the bishopric of Gloucester in 1781 on the grounds of ill-health. Bottom of illustration: Lt Athur Francis Maine (1854)  Died of dysentry in trenches at Sebastopol (Crimean War)
North Aisle

Left: Francis Francis (1886) Angler, author, journalist

Above & Left: Jane Austen (1817) the well known author. Ledger stone and wall brass

 

Far Left: Ann Morley (1787); no relation of Bishop Morley; below is the monument to Francis Mc Dougal DCL FRC (1856) Bishop of Labuan & Sarawak. & Henrietta (1836)

Sir Villiers Chernocke (1779) Marble by S Walldin of Winchester

Edward Cole (1617) Mayor  The inscription plate is blank but a later tablet below gives details

Thomas Clerk of Hide (1629) The inscription refers to  Avington church where they are more Clark  monuments  but the church was rebuilt and the monuments lost

Dr Mathew Coombe MD (1748)  'He exercised his art with a singular hapiness in the City of Winchester' for 54 years.

 

Dr Andrew Crawford MD (1824)

 George Hurst (1793) & Isabella (1772)

Dr John Littlehales FRCP  (1810)
By John Bacon Jnr. The relief is of the Good Samaritan

Lt-Col Piggott CB DSO (1897)
Oval of oxidized silver showing him leading his charger  carrying a wounded soldier.

Hon Edward Montagu MP (1775) & Elizabeth (1800) Founder of the Blue Stocking Club. She had requested that their infant son, who had died in 1744 and had been buried in Yorkshire, be reburied with his parents; this was carried out a month later

Colonel James Morgan (1808)
He was the son-in-law of Dr Warton. By Bacon Jnr.
Note the tiny pelican

Katherine Pool (1779) & her father Major Thomas Lacy (1763) Her husband, Mjr Nevinson Pool, wounded at the Battle of Dettingen, died in 1806 but this is not recorded on the monument.

     

Above Far Left - starting at the top and working clockwise: Prebendary Dr Charles Woodroffe  (1726) & Elizabeth
Charles Stanley Nicholson (killed in action Somme 1916)
Major Arthur John Byng Wavell MC (killed in action Mwele 1916) while commanding The Arab Rifles
Canon Thomas Woodroffe MA (1876) Dr Charles's son
Mjr Archibald John Arthur, 2nd Earl Wavell (Killed 1953) On Christmas Eve
Field Marshal Archibald Percival, 1st Earl Wavell (1950) Viceroy of India etc





 
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